food in Morocco

Marrakech food tour: The best food in Morocco

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From slow roasted lamb to delectable traditional pastries, aromatic spices and tons of olives. I’m heading deep into Medina in an ambitious attempt to discover the secrets of the Moroccan food. Join me on this tasty journey featuring the best food in Morocco.

 

 

Lamb, lamb, lamb

As the night is gently falling over Marrakech, we enter a small humble restaurant not far from Jemaa el-Fnaa. There’s almost no one there, just two local men drinking tea having an intimate conversation. The only thing I know is that I’m going to try lamb.

The waiter serves two different dishes and a pile of traditional bread. The smell hits my nose and unleashes my curiosity.

“Try the cheek! It’s the best!”, Mohamed invites me while pointing at the lamb head in front of me.

And so I do. I pull a piece of meat and sprinkle it with cumin and salt. That’s the right way to eat it, as I heard. After a night in the oven, it’s so appetizing and tender. I’m chewing this scrumptious mixture of meat and spices and I’m thinking:

“What the heck?! I don’t even like lamb!” While I’m sinking into my own confusion, I prepare my next bite – a piece of a lamb cooked in a clay pot.

“It’s Marrakechi Tangia.”, Mohamed says. “It’s typical for this region.”

I give a slight nod as a sign of understanding while the meat is melting in my mouth.

 

 

The Kingdom of olives

I’m strolling along the busy narrow streets of Medina and the bustle swallows me slowly. Imperceptibly, I find myself on a square surrounded by olive stalls. There is a slightly sour smell in the air blended with some herbs.

“Let’s try some olives.”, Mohamed suggests and I silently agree.

We approach a stand heavily loaded with piles of olives of all kind. Spicy, sour, with herbs or just salty, I like them all. Meanwhile, I can’t move my eyes away from the jars stuffed with beautifully arranged olives, lemons, and peppers.

 

 

Msemmen aka Moroccan pancakes

My tour in search of the best food in Morocco continues along one of the most lively areas of Medina. I try to keep an eye on Mohamed and the others but it’s hard. So much is going on around me – wandering customers, persuasive merchants, and seductive goods. Suddenly, we make an improvised stop in front of a little shop.

“Would you like to try some pancakes?”, Mohamed inquiries as he immediately orders.

We are going to try Msemmen known as Moroccan pancakes with butter and honey.

“It smells so nice”, I note while I’m staring impatiently at my pancake on the stove.

The taste is a bit different than the one I’m used to but it’s so delightful. That would be a decent ending of a night out but no, there is more Moroccan food to be discovered tonight.

 

Msemmen Moroccan pancackes food tour in Marrakech

 

Sardine Sandwich – Junk food Moroccan style

We are in a small but lively square in front of a local joint.

“This is the best place to try sardines.”, Mohamed claims.

He also shares that Morocco is one of the largest exporters of sardines in the world. While we are having this conversation the owner of the place serves the sardines. Absolutely not what I expected. Hout quoari is a sandwich with grilled sardine meatballs, onion, green olives, tomato sauce, and Moroccan butter. It’s a common food in Morocco and it tastes heavenly.

“Ingenious!“, I exclaim.

Certainly the most bizarre burger I’ve ever tried.

 

Sardine sandwich in Marrakech

 

Couscous at another level

At this point of our food tour, I feel my stomach almost full. However, we are on our way to a very special place to have a proper Moroccan dinner.

It’s unbelievably quiet and it’s hard to believe that we are in the heart of Marrakech. We are passing between some herb stalls and find our way to a small square. I see the place. It’s not a restaurant. There is just one table under the clear starry sky, perfectly arranged, waiting for us. A middle-aged woman greets us and we take our places. She first brings mint tea and Mohamed pours it the usual way – from high up.

We start with a traditional Moroccan salad called Zaalouk. It’s a common side dish with eggplants, tomatoes, and spices well moistened with olive oil.

 

Traditional Moroccan dinner

 

“Keep some space for the couscous.”, Mohamed recommends. “You haven’t tried anything like this before.”, he adds.

Shortly after that, the woman brings a big tajine with couscous with vegetables called Couscous Tfaya.

It truly doesn’t look like the couscous I know. Nope, not at all. That woman spent hours to prepare it. She didn’t just put it in a boiling water for 10 min but used a special technique and steamed it several times. As a result, the couscous is so smooth and light.

Various types of perfectly cooked vegetables lie above it but the very best component is the caramelized onion sprinkled with raisins at the top. Mouth-watering, right? Without any doubt, this is one of the finest Moroccan dishes.

 

Traditional Moroccan couscous

 

A sweet finish

It’s time to put an end to our exceptional night of exploring the Moroccan cuisine. We are in a small bakery but a whole new galaxy of tastes. The abundance of different pastries and sweets makes me dizzy. I simply cannot choose. Hopefully, the staff step in and I receive a plate with the nicest and most traditional Moroccan pastries.

“Would you like to try a smoothie?”, Mohamed addresses me.

“Sure!”, I take a gander at the menu and shoot: “Avocado, dates, and almonds.”

Ah, it’s such a perfect night to chill outside and observe the boiling life around you over some sweet pleasures.

 

Moroccan sweets

 

Special thanks to Mohamed and Marrakech Food Tours for taking care of filling my stomach and showing me some of the best food in Morocco.

Have you ever tried Moroccan food? Do you have a favorite dish?

 

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